Claim up to £10K
for eco home
improvements.

100% UK Government funded*

Increase the value
of your property

Lower your
monthly energy bills

Reduce your
carbon footprint

Have you already heard about the government eco grants?

But finding it hard to understand...

Do not know where to start?

Is the application process complicated?

Do not understand eco technologies?

Can't find anyone to help?

Our experts will make your claim process hassle free.

Prince Williams

Duke of Cambridge

"We believe that this decade is one of the most crucial decades for the environment and by 2030 we really hope to have made huge strides in fixing some of the biggest problems the Earth faces"

David Attenborough

broadcast and naturalist

"Right now, we are facing a man-made disaster of global scale. Our greatest threat in thousands of years Climate change"

Greta Thunberg

environmental activist

"You must unite behind the science. You must take action. You must do the impossible. Because giving up can never ever be an option"

About us

Ecogrant.UK was the brainchild of a group of active environmentalists based in the UK. They came together with a sole purpose which was to help the UK government meet its 2050 net-zero emissions target. The target will require the UK to bring all greenhouse gas emissions to net zero by 2050. The passing of this target in law means the UK will become the first major economy in the world to end its contribution to global warming by 2050.


We want to make ECO technologies accessible to everyone. To meet this goal, we have made our service totally free for you, no hidden costs, or fees. We work directly with our government endorsed partners on your behalf and ensure you have a hassle-free experience when claiming your grant.

 

Our installers are endorsed by

How to start

1.

Arrange a call-back or check eligibility online.

2.

Complete a short questionnaire with our experts.

3.

Choose your ECO home improvements.

4.

Free site survey and installation date agreed.

5.

Enjoy your ECO-friendly home.

Our promise

Hassle free application process

Works carried out by government endorsed installers

Lower monthly bills

Increased property value

What our customers say

Lily Myers

"Thank you for helping me claim my £10K grant. I have had my loft insulated and a new boiler installed. My bills have dropped by almost £18 per month."

David Cohen

"Thanks for helping me with a new boiler and floor insulation. My living room is much more comfortable and my heating bill has been almost halved."

Michelle Crawley

"You guys have been a great help. I am extremely pleased with your service. I will definitely be recommending your services."

Why are you paying higher monthly bills?

With our ECO grants we can help you
lower your monthly energy bills. 

Do you want to increase the value of your home?

With our ECO home improvements
we will increase the value of your home.

Will you do your part in reducing climate change?

With our ECO technologies you can reduce your carbon footprint and help the UK meet its 2050 net zero emission targets. 

About ECO

  • Government backed to make UK homes more energy efficient.
  • Estimated £640 Million in funding available across the UK. Hurry!
  • Insulation, Gas Boilers and Other ECO Solutions available.
  • Funding is Limited to an Estimated 900,000 properties – Be Quick!
  • Based on your personal circumstance and EPC rating of your property.

ECO technologies

Air Source
Heat Pumps
Biomass
Boilers
Combi
Boilers
Double Glazing and Energy Efficient Doors
Draught
Proofing
External Wall
Insulation
Ground Source
Heat Pump
Smart Heating Controls inc. TRV's
Solar Thermal Hot
Water Systems
Underfloor
Insulation

Air Source Heat Pump

An air source heat pump is a low carbon heating system and works differently to a boiler. Rather than burning a fuel like gas or oil, it uses electricity to transfer heat from one place to another. In this case, from the outside air to your home to provide space heating and hot water.


How it works

The Air Source Heat Pump An air source heat pump takes heat from the outside air and transfers it to a working fluid. It can do this even when the air is well below freezing. The heat pump then uses a compressor to change the pressure and temperature of the fluid until it's warm enough to provide heating for your home.


Water Cylinder

The heat captured by the working fluid travels through a coil in the water cylinder. This allows heat to be transferred from the coil to the water as efficiently as possible.


Hybrid air source heating system

Alternatively, you may wish to consider a hybrid heating system, where more than one heating technology is used within the same heating system. There is significant variation in the types of hybrid systems and appliances available today, but hybrid heating often refers to the combination of an air-source heat pump and a gas boiler. This could be either as a single appliance which combines these technologies, or as a separate heat pump and boiler operating within the same system.


Benefits

  • Low carbon heat source.
  • Potentially low running costs.
  • Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive payments can result in good payback.
  • Can heat both home and water.

Biomass Boilers

Biomass systems are wood-fuelled heating systems. They burn wood pellets, chips or logs to provide warmth in a single room or to power central heating and hot water cylinders to heat the whole house.


A stove burns logs or pellets to heat a single room - and may be fitted with a back boiler to provide water heating as well. A boiler burns logs, pellets or chips, and is connected to a central heating and hot water system. Wood-heating systems are often better suited to larger buildings which may be difficult to insulate, and therefore less suitable for a heat pump system. Biomass boilers are larger than gas or oil equivalents and you will need space to store the fuel. This area will need to be somewhere that's handy for deliveries as well as appropriate for feeding the boiler. You will need to consider that fuel prices may rise, and also check that you are physically able to add fuel to the boiler.


Every stove or boiler will need an appropriate flue. You will need a flue which meets the regulations for wood-burning appliances. This could be a new insulated stainless steel flue pipe or an existing chimney, though chimneys normally need lining to make them safe and legal.


Boiler vs stove:

Boilers can be used in place of a standard gas or oil boiler to heat radiators for a whole house, and to heat the hot water. Stoves are used to heat a single room, usually in conjunction with other heating systems, but may also have a back boiler to provide hot water. Stoves are not eligible under both the domestic RHI or Green Homes Grant unless it is a pellet stove with a back boiler.


Woodchips are generally used to heat larger buildings or groups of houses.


Pellets are much easier to use and much more controllable than logs. Pellet boilers can run automatically in much the same way that gas or oil boilers operate. Most pellet and chip burners use automatic fuel feeders which refill them at regular intervals.


Log-burning stoves and boilers have to be filled with wood by hand and require considerably more work. You will need a lot of logs to heat a whole house, but they can be cheaper than pellets if you have a good local supply.


Some companies now offer deliveries of pellets anywhere in mainland Britain and Northern Ireland while the supply of logs is more variable.


Benefits

  • Very low carbon heating
  • Can be fully automatic
  • Can be financially attractive with Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive payments

Combi Boilers

A gas combi boiler is designed to be a highly-efficient means of concurrently heating the water within your home and providing central heating. Combination boilers control your whole central heating system directly from one, compact unit and provide a range of advantages based on factors such as space, energy and costs.


One of the main features of these boilers is their ability to provide instantaneous hot water without water tanks or cylinders, making them typically easy to install and less likely to take up excessive space.


This water is filtered through your pipes and fed into your household taps whilst also being used to heat up your radiators. By turning on the hot water tap, you trigger a response that signals the boiler to start heating water from the inside of the system. The heat exchanger transfers the majority of the heat from the burnt gas inside of the boiler to the cold water, and then delivers it to the taps as required.


Modern combination boilers are manufactured to double as condensing boilers which means that they are able to generate water vapour condensation to extract additional heat from its fuel. This is designed to make them even more energy-efficient as they produce more heat with less energy, potentially enabling you to reduce your monthly bills.


The control valves in combination boilers operate in different directions, so it either allows water to flow through the central heating system or diverts it to the appropriate hot water tap— but never both at the same time. You have the option of pre-setting your desired room temperature, this programmes the boiler to work with the room thermostat to ensure your home is heated as you like.


Benefits

  • Compact
  • Instantaneous Hot Water
  • Efficient & Economical Improve EPC rating of your home
  • Increase value of your home

Double / Triple Glazing and Secondary Glazing

Single glazed windows lose a lot of heat to the outside air because the single pane of glass is not a good insulator. If you fit double glazed windows instead, then the air gap between the two panes of glass will insulate your window. This will stop heat escaping so quickly and make your room warmer.


Some double glazed windows have a different gas between the panes of glass, or a special coating on one of the panes. Both of these can insulate the window a bit more. Modern windows also have insulated frames so you don’t lose too much heat around the edges. 


If any of the windows in your home have single glazing, then these will be the worst parts of the building in terms of energy performance. They'll make your home more expensive to heat, and you'll feel cold when you stand near them. They'll also attract condensation and, if the windows are old, they’re probably letting in draughts too.


You can also improve the performance of a window by fitting a secondary glazing layer on the inside – effectively you’re fitting an extra window in the same gap in the wall. 


If you replace an old window with double glazing, you are cutting heat loss mainly by adding the layer of air that’s trapped between the two panes of glass. You can do much the same thing by leaving the original window in place and fitting an extra pane to the inside. This is called secondary glazing.


Secondary glazing can be effective if you have old windows but you can’t afford to replace them, or you’re not allowed to, or you just don’t want to change the way your house looks from the outside.


Benefits 

  • Reduce Heat loss by 30%
  • Reduce external noise
  • Eliminate Condensation
  • Improve the appearance of your home
  • Increase security
  • Increase the value of your home 

Drought Proofing

Sealing the unwanted gaps around your doors and windows will help keep the heat in, and will cut down on cold draughts throughout your home.


Every external door and every opening window in your home has a gap round the edge that should seal tight when the door or window is fully closed. If the seal isn’t good enough, then cold air can blow in through the gap, and warm air can blow out. Old or badly fitted windows can have gaps around the frame or glass even if they don’t open, and doors can have extra gaps around a letter box, cat flap or keyhole.


This will increase your heating bills, because all the money you spent heating this air up is wasted as soon as the air leaks out. You will also feel less comfortable in a draughty house, because the cold air feels even colder if it is blowing through the room.


Draught-proofing an existing door or window is fairly straightforward, provided you use the right materials for each job. You can either pay a professional to choose the right products and fit them correctly, or you can buy your own and fit them yourself.


Draught-proofing is different to double glazing, and it does a different job. Double glazing is designed to stop heat escaping through the glass itself. Draught-proofing is designed to stop heat escaping through gaps around the edges. 


Benefits 

  • Prevent cold draughts 
  • Reduce Heat Loss
  • Save Money on energy bills
  • Reduce condensation
  • Reduce carbon footprint 

External Wall Insulation

Insulation can be added to the inside or outside surface of your walls to help keep your home warm and cut your heating bills. 


If your walls are not suitable for standard cavity wall insulation, then it may be possible to fit solid wall insulation instead. A layer of insulation material is fixed either to the inside surface of your walls (internal wall insulation) or to the outside (external wall insulation). The insulation layer is then covered with another layer to protect the insulation. This covering layer will also allow decorating if on the inside, or will keep the rain out if on the outside.


Pre 1920’s 

If your house was built before the 1920s, then it is quite likely to have solid walls. Some newer houses were built without a standard cavity, in which case solid wall insulation may be the best option.


Before about 1920, most houses in the UK were built with solid walls – that is, the outside walls were made of a single solid layer of brick or stone. During the 1920s it became increasingly common to build houses with an inner and an outer leaf with an air gap in between. This is known as a cavity wall, as opposed to a solid wall with no air gap.


If you have a cavity wall, then you should check first if you can have cavity wall insulation – or if you have it already. If possible, this is much cheaper than solid wall insulation.


Some houses are not built of standard brick, stone or block. For example, they may have a steel frame, or could be made from concrete panels. Solid wall insulation may be the best option for these houses.


If you are in any doubt about how you can insulate your walls, you should arrange for an installer to come and visit. They will organise an assessment of your building to determine the best approach for you.


Benefits 

  • Big reduction in heating bills.
  • Can last a very long time.
  • Increase your EPC rating 

Ground Source Heat Pump

A ground source heat pump is a low carbon heating system and works differently to a boiler. Rather than burning a fuel like gas or oil, it uses electricity to transfer heat from one place to another. In this case, from the ground to your home to provide space heating and hot water. 


Left to its own devices, heat will normally flow from a hot place to anywhere that is colder. A heat pump is an appliance that makes heat flow in the opposite direction – it “pumps” the heat from a cold place to somewhere that is warmer.


A ground source heat pump takes heat from the ground and transfers it to a working fluid. It does this either through a horizontal loop of pipework buried beneath the ground (a ground loop) or from holes drilled vertically into the ground (a borehole). The heat pump then uses a compressor to change the pressure and temperature of the fluid until it is warm enough to provide heating for the house.


The heat pump uses electricity, so it is not free to use and it is not yet zero carbon. But provided that the heat pump is properly installed in a suitable building, it will produce more energy as heat than it uses as electricity. If it runs efficiently it can be cheap to use and will be a low carbon heating option for your home.


Heat pumps are more efficient when they give out heat at a relatively low temperature. They are often used with underfloor heating, as this can operate successfully at low temperatures, but they can be used with conventional radiators. 

Ground source heat pumps require either a large garden or similar area for a ground loop, or a smaller area with access for drilling equipment, for a borehole. They are most likely to be attractive in homes that are well insulated, and where other heating options like gas are not available. 


Heat pumps are more efficient when they do not have to raise the temperature of the heat they extract too much. This means they are more efficient when they can run a heating circuit at a lower temperature. If your home is well-insulated then it needs less heat to keep it warm. Where possible, it is recommended that you have a minimum level of insulation in your home, such as loft and cavity wall insulation, before you consider installing a heat pump.  


Benefits

  • Low carbon heat source
  • Potentially low running costs
  • Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive payments can result in good payback 

Smart Heating Controls inc. TRV's

All heating control systems essentially do two things – they control when you want the heating on, and how warm you want your home to get when the heating is on. They may also do the same for your hot water.


There are lots of types of controls available to do this, but a fully controlled heating system should include at least: 


A thermostat on the heating source (e.g. a boiler thermostat that sets the temperature of the water that will be pumped from the boiler through the radiators and, for a combination boiler, the hot water)


A timer or programmer function – this sets the time for when the heating comes on and when it goes off.


A room thermostat – this sets the temperature for that room, and turns the heating off when the room gets warmer than this. Thermostatic Radiator Valves (TRVs) should NOT be fitted in this room.

 

Thermostatic radiator valves – these are fitted to all of the radiators elsewhere in the house, and they control the temperature in each room.


Benefits 

  • Range of options to suit different households
  • Can cut your heating bills significantly 
  • Helps to keep your home at a comfortable temperature 
  • Some models can be controlled from any internet connected device. 
  • Also come with a range of other parts to allow integration with other smart home appliances. 

Solar Thermal Hot Water Systems

Solar thermal panels provide hot water for your taps and showers when the sun shines.


Solar thermal panels are usually fitted to your roof and connected to your hot water cylinder, or to a new hot water cylinder. When the sun shines, water is heated up in the panel, which is pumped round a circuit of pipes. Heat from the pipes is used to heat the water in the hot water cylinder. Sometimes this is enough on its own to get the hot water up to temperature. 


Solar thermal panels are usually installed in homes with a central heating system such as a boiler and hot water cylinder. It can be possible to fit solar thermal panels with a combi boiler. 


Collectors / Panels 

Solar thermal collectors capture the sun’s energy by heating a fluid (glycol). 


Pump & Controller 

The pump ensures the transfer fluid is circulated between the collectors and the water cylinder efficiently. While a system control panel controls the pump and provides information on the system’s performance, as well as any faults. 


Water Cylinder 

The heat captured by the solar thermal collectors is pumped to a coil in the water cylinder. A solar thermal water cylinder has a dedicated coil that allows the heat from the collectors to be transferred as efficiently as possible.


Benefits 

  • Free energy from the sun
  • Cuts your carbon emissions and fuel bills
  • Increases EPC rating of your home 
  • Quick to install and can be integrated into existing heating systems. 
  • Smaller roof space required because of the advanced technology our panels are supplied with. 
  • Lower carbon footprint 
  • Solar collectors (panels) will also work in overcast weather conditions. 
  • Can generate upto 60% of hot water needs throughout the year. 

Underfloor Insulation

Solid Floor

Adding insulation to an existing solid floor not straightforward, but it will help you make sure your whole house is keeping the heat in. 


If your house has a solid concrete floor, then there are two ways it can be insulated.


It may be possible to add a layer of rigid insulation board on top of the existing concrete, with a layer of boarding on top of that to create a new floor level. You will lose some headroom, and you will have to move or adjust skirting boards, doors, any fitted cupboards, and maybe electrical sockets or plumbing.


The alternative is to dig out the existing concrete, dig down further and add a new damp-proof membrane, a layer of rigid insulation and a new concrete screed or other flooring. This is an expensive and disruptive job, and is usually carried out as part of a major refurbishment project, or when there is a problem with the existing floor.


If you have an old solid floor made of stone flags or similar, then the best way to insulate it is to remove the flagstones, dig down and add a membrane, insulation and screed, before re-laying the stones. This is a big task, but it has the advantage of adding a damp-proof layer which probably wasn’t there before.


Suspended Floor 

If your house has a suspended timber floor on the ground floor, then a layer of insulation can be held in place under the floor between the joists. This is called Under Floor Insulation (UFI).


The first step is to remove any carpet or floor covering so that you can access and lift the floorboards to see if your home could have UFI. Before carrying out any work, a thorough inspection of all the joists and underfloor timbers should be carried out by an approved professional for signs of damp, rot or insect damage, and appropriate repairs carried out if required.


There are several different insulation materials and products which can be used, including mineral wool, rigid boards and foam and professional advice should be obtained on the appropriate thickness of each of these to be installed in your home. Regardless of which product is selected it is important to ensure that no gaps are left in the insulation coverage, especially between the end joists and the floor perimeter wall.


If you have an unheated cellar beneath your house, you can fit the insulation from underneath without removing the floor covering and floorboards.


Benefits 

  • Lasts a long time
  • Often overlooked when insulating a house 
  • Can last a long time – 20 years with BBA safety certificate (Suspended Floor)
  • Available to over 10 million UK homes (Suspended Floor) 

Download and learn more about ECO technologies. 

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